Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Registration open for CHCI Public Humanities Network’s virtual gathering on “The Archaeology of Redress”

The Public Humanities Network of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI), in partnership with the Whiting Foundation, has organized a series of of virtual gatherings called “The Humanities Tomorrow,” the second of which will take place Friday, Nov. 13 from 2:30 – 4 p.m. ET. Registration is now open for the online conversation on “Cultural Preservation and Storytelling – The Archaeology of Redress.”

These gatherings are designed to share experiences of contemporary humanities projects by scholars who are visionaries and change-makers, with a focus on practical lessons we might share as a community in committing to this work.

Each gathering will last no longer than 90 minutes, will be open to everyone who registers in advance, and will be recorded for sharing through the CHCI afterwards.

Public Humanities Network members may also like to register for the National Humanities Conference on November 6, 10, 12, and 13, which is hosted virtually by the Federation of State Humanities Councils and the National Humanities Alliance.

 

“The Public Humanities Tomorrow: Cultural Preservation and Storytelling – The Archaeology of Redress

Date: Friday, November 13, 2020
Time: 2:30 – 4 p.m. ET
Registration required – available here

As archaeologists working in communities that have been impacted by colonialism we are constantly confronted with the troubles of uncovering and interpreting difficult histories. Is it possible to move beyond merely reiterating narratives of trauma and their legacies? Can we as archaeologists begin to imagine forms of redress? Building off of frameworks in community-engaged scholarships, we explore the ways in which our community-engaged practice requires us at times to step outside of our disciplinary training to imagine a praxis of redress.

Panelists:
Justin Dunnavant, Vanderbilt University
Ayana Omilade Flewellen, University of California, Riverside
Gabby Omoni Hartemann, The Federal University of Minas Gerais

Chair:
Alexandra Jones, Archaeology in the Community

Fourth in series of Coastal Conversations now available from Mellon-funded consortium

The Coasts, Climates, Humanities and the Environment Consortium is funded by a pilot grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for two years. Its partners are the University of Georgia, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Florida, and Louisiana State University. The consortium has a series of site-specific and publicly engaged research projects in coastal sites, which look at questions of climate breakdown, community resilience and the capacity of the humanities to imagine the futures of places under threat from storms and sea-level rise.

This is the last in a series of four conversations featuring participants in the consortium and scholars whose research informs its work. All four conversations are available here.

The full conversation and a short preview are below.

The participants are:

Jacqueline Lawton, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
Stephen Berry, University of Georgia
Ken Sassaman, University of Florida
Nicholas Allen, moderator, University of Georgia

 

FULL CONVERSATION

 

PREVIEW

2019-2020 Faculty Achievements and Awards

The University of Georgia faculty in the humanities and arts frequently have great success at winning awards and fellowships from national and international organizations. Here are a few highlights from the 2019-2020 academic year.

A more exhaustive list of recent external grants, fellowships, and awards is available here.

External Fellowships

Joshua Barkan (Geography), Institute for Advance Study – Princeton, NJ, for 2020

Rachel Gabara (Romance Languages), NEH Fellowship for 2020

Diana Graizbord (Sociology), Institute for Advance Study – Princeton, NJ, for 2020

Jennifer Palmer (History), ACLS Fellowship for 2020

Cassia Roth (History), Gilder Lehrman Center Fellowship for May 2021

Timothy Yang (History), Association for Asian Studies Northeast Asia Council Japan Research Grant (summer 2019)

External Awards and Honors

Mark Abbe (Lamar Dodd School of Art) was awarded the Gerda Henkel Stiftung – Funding Initiative Patrimonies, 2020, for The Aphrodite−Al-‘Uzzá Conservation Collaborative: Conserving and Presenting Newly Discovered Marble Sculpture at The Petra Museum, Jordan.

Imi Hwangbo (Lamar Dodd School of Art) was one of our five Women to Watch featured in “Paper Routes – Georgia Women to Watch 2020” exhibition opening January 24th at the Museum of Contemporary Art Georgia (MOCA GA). Women to Watch is an exhibition program, held every two to three years, developed specifically for the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) national and international outreach committees. Each of these exhibitions features emerging and underrepresented women artists from the states and countries in which the museum has outreach committees. The exhibition focuses on the transformation of paper into complex works of art.

Derrick Lemons (Religion) was named a visiting professor at Christ Church, the University of Oxford.

Esra Santesso (English) was awarded an NEH Summer Stipend for 2020 for her project on Representations of Islam and Muslims in Contemporary Graphic Narratives.

Elizabeth Wright (Romance Languages), editor, Bulletin of the Comediantes, 2019 Best Design Award from the Council for Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ)

 

The University of Georgia Research Awards, sponsored by the nonprofit University of Georgia Research Foundation, recognize outstanding research and scholarship by UGA faculty and graduate students whose bodies of work have gained broad recognition across many disciplines.

2019-2020 UGA Research Award winners in the humanities and arts

Joshua Bynum, Hugh Hodgson School of Music, Creative Research Medal

Peter Van Zandt Lane, Hugh Hodgson School of Music, Michael F. Adams Early Career Scholar Award

Richard Menke, Department of English, Albert Christ-Janer Creative Research Award

Elizabeth Wright, Department of Romance Languages, Distinguished Research Professor

Second of four Coastal Conversations now available from Mellon-funded consortium

The Coasts, Climates, Humanities and the Environment Consortium is funded by a pilot grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for two years. Its partners are the University of Georgia, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Florida and Louisiana State University. The consortium has a series of site-specific and publicly engaged research projects in coastal sites, which look at questions of climate breakdown, community resilience and the capacity of the humanities to imagine the futures of places under threat from storms and sea-level rise.

This is the second in a series of conversations featuring participants in the consortium and scholars whose research informs its work. The first conversation is available here.

The full conversation and a short preview are below.

The participants are:

Malinda Maynor Lowery, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Terry Harpold, University of Florida
Craig Colten, Louisiana State University
Nicholas Allen, moderator, University of Georgia

 

FULL CONVERSATION

 

PREVIEW

First of four Coastal Conversations now available from Mellon-funded consortium

The Coasts, Climates, Humanities and the Environment Consortium is funded by a pilot grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for two years. Its partners are the University of Georgia, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Florida and Louisiana State University. The consortium has a series of site-specific and publicly engaged research projects in coastal sites, which look at questions of climate breakdown, community resilience and the capacity of the humanities to imagine the futures of places under threat from storms and sea-level rise.

This is the first in a series of conversations featuring participants in the consortium and scholars whose research informs its work.

The full conversation and a short preview are provided here.

NOTE: There are some brief network interruptions during the beginning of the conversation, which end after about six minutes. We apologize for the distraction.

The participants are:

Steven Mentz, St. Johns University
Valerie Babb, Emory University
Alexandra Campbell, Edinburgh Napier University
Ryan Emmanuel, North Carolina State University
Nicholas Allen, moderator, University of Georgia

FULL CONVERSATION

PREVIEW