2023 UGA Humanities Festival

UGA Humanities CouncilThe University of Georgia presents its first Humanities Festival, a series of public events showcasing the richness and diversity of research and practice in the humanities at UGA and throughout our extended community. The festival is organized by the UGA Humanities Council.

The UGA Humanities Council is supported by the Office of Research, the Office of the Provost, and the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, with the participation of more than 30 colleges, schools, departments, and units across the university.

 

Highlights

 

David BeavanMar 15 • 4 pm • Special Collections Auditorium

David Beavan: “Beyond Digital Humanities: Weaving Humanities, Research Software Engineering and AI”

David Beavan is acting principal research software engineer in the Research Engineering Group (REG) at The Alan Turing Institute, and a research affiliate at the University of Edinburgh Centre for Data, Culture & Society (CDCS).

Beavan has been Research Engineering‘s lead for Accelerating AI in the Arts and Humanities. He has led the Research Engineering Group’s work on Data-centric Engineering projects such as AI for Control Problems, Vehicle Grid Integration and the development of the Data Safe Haven Classification Web App. He is an organizer of the award-winning Turing Data Stories, an open community creating and curating data stories.

He is vice president and trustee of the Society of Research Software Engineering, and is a member of the UKRI Peer Review College, reviewing for both AHRC and ESRC. Beavan has served the digital humanities community as an elected member of the European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH), and was a former co-organizer of the Humanities and Data Science Turing Interest Group.

Prior to joining the Turing Institute, he was associate director for research at the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities (UCLDH) and research manager for the UCL Faculty of Arts & Humanities. He has worked on large-scale projects of international and national importance, such as the Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech and its sibling projects, including the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing, while at the University of Glasgow.

This event is presented by the Willson Center Digital Humanities Lab (DigiLab), the UGA Libraries, and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Founders GardenMarch 15 • 5:30 pm • Founders Memorial Garden

Kickoff Reception for the UGA Humanities Festival

A public gathering with refreshments and conversation to introduce the UGA Humanities Festival in its first year, with remarks by Alan Dorsey, Dean of the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

This event is presented by the UGA Humanities Council.

 

 

Jack DavisMar 16 • 5 pm • Jackson St. Building, Room 125

Jack Davis: Odum Environmental Ethics Lecture – “The Bald Eagle: The History of a Symbol and Species”

Jack Davis is Rothman Family Chair in the Humanities at the University of Florida. He specializes in environmental history and sustainability studies, and is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea (2017). His latest book, The Bald Eagle: The Improbable Journey of America’s Bird (Liveright/W. W. Norton, 2022) was named a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, one of the five best nonfiction books of 2022 by the LA Times, an Amazon Best Book of 2022, and an Apple Best Book of 2022.

Davis was one of the recipients of the 2019 Andrew Carnegie fellowship award. His previous books include Race Against Time: Culture and Separation in Natchez Since 1930 (2001), winner of the Charles S. Sydnor Prize for the best book in southern history, and An Everglades Providence: Marjory Stoneman Douglas and the American Environmental Century (2009), which received a gold medal from the Florida Book Awards.

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program, the College of Environment + Design, and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center‘s Global Georgia public event series.

 

Paula KrebsMar 17 • 4 pm • Delta Innovation Hub

Paula Krebs: “The Humanities at Work”

Paula M. Krebs became executive director of the Modern Language Association in August 2017. She administers the programs, governance, and business affairs of the association and is general editor of the association’s publishing and research programs, as well as editor of two association publications.

Krebs previously served as the dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Bridgewater State University. Before arriving at Bridgewater State, she was special assistant to the president for external relations at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, an American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow in the president’s office of the University of Massachusetts, and a professor and department chair at Wheaton. She has also been a regular contributor to higher education publications, including the Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Vitae.

A member of the MLA Executive Council from 2013 to January 2017, Krebs also served on the executive committee of the MLA’s Association of Departments of English (2003–05). She served on the Massachusetts ACE Women’s Network Board of Directors and was a member of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities Board of Directors from 2009 to 2015.

Krebs earned a PhD in English from Indiana University, where she specialized in Victorian literature and culture, and a BA from La Salle College (now La Salle University).

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia event series.

 

Mar 17 • 7:30 pm • Hendershot’s

Willson Center St. Patrick’s Day celebration with Hog-Eyed Paddy

The Willson Center for Humanities and Arts will host a public celebration of St. Patrick’s Day with Irish music and good cheer at Hendershot’s, which will be free and open to all. Athens duo Hog-Eyed Man will join with multi-instrumentalist Paddy League to form the redoubtable Hog-Eyed Paddy, and to make this a very special evening not to be missed.

Fiddler Jason Cade and multi-instrumentalist Rob McMaken usually record and perform as the acclaimed string duo Hog-Eyed Man, playing the traditional music of the southern Appalachians, including many tunes that crossed the Atlantic from Ireland in the 19th century or even earlier. Both hold a deep appreciation for traditional Irish music. McMaken honed his fiddle-tune chops busking in New Orleans, while Cade lived for many years in both Ireland and New York City, where he played in and led weekly sessions with some of today’s best Irish musicians. In 2005, Cade won the senior fiddle division of the Mid-Atlantic Fleadh, allowing him to compete in the All-Ireland Fleadh, held in County Donegal that year. As Cade and McMaken await the production and release of their fifth Hog-Eyed Man album, they have rekindled the Irish music flame.

Multi-instrumentalist Paddy League grew up in a family of Irish and Greek migrants.  He has performed and recorded with John Doyle, Mick Moloney, Martin Hayes, John Whelan, James Kelly, Susan McKeown, Jerry O’Sullivan, and many other artists on both sides of the Atlantic. He puts an intimate, improvisatory spin on the commonalities between Irish, Scottish, and Quebecois traditions. Paddy is assistant professor of ethnomusicology at Florida State University and director of the Center for Music of the Americas. He plays bodhran, guitar, mandolin, bouzouki, and concertina, among other instruments.

This event is presented by the Willson Center and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Young PlatoMar 20 • 7:30 pm • Ciné

Screening and Conversation: Young Plato

The documentary Young Plato tells the story of Kevin McArevey, the headmaster of an all-boys primary school in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and his novel approach to addressing issues of poverty, inner-city decay, and the legacy of sectarian violence that are deeply embedded in his students’ lives: through the teaching and application of Classical philosophy. By encouraging the students to identify and examine fundamental questions about themselves, each other, and the society into which they were born, McArevey is determined to change their outlook on life, and the future of their community.

The screening will be followed by a conversation and Q&A with Ian Altman, faculty in English and language arts at Clarke Central High School; Aaron Meskin, professor and head of the UGA department of philosophy; and philosophy teaching assistant Rissa Willis.

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the department of philosophy, and the UGA Humanities Council. It is part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia event series.

 

Malinda LoweryMar 21 • 4 pm • Special Collections Auditorium

Malinda Maynor Lowery: Women’s History Month Keynote – “Stories of Lumbee Women”

Malinda Maynor Lowery is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University. She is a historian and documentary film producer who is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. In July 2021 she joined Emory University as the Cahoon Family Professor of American History, after spending 12 years at UNC-Chapel Hill and four years at Harvard University. Her second book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle, was published by UNC Press in 2018. The book is a survey of Lumbee history from the eighteenth century to the present, written for a general audience. Her first book, Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (UNC Press, 2010). It won several awards, including Best First Book of 2010 in Native American and Indigenous Studies.

She has written over twenty book chapters or articles, on topics including American Indian migration and identity, school desegregation, federal recognition, religious music, and foodways, and has published essays for popular audiences in places like the New York Times, Oxford American, and Daily Yonder. She has won fellowships and grants from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Sundance Institute, the Ford Foundation, and others. Films she has produced include the Peabody Award-winning A Chef’s Life (PBS, 2013-2018), Somewhere South (PBS, 2020), Road to Race Day (Crackle, 2020), the Emmy-nominated Private Violence (HBO, 2014), In the Light of Reverence (PBS, 2001), and two short films, Real Indian (1996), and Sounds of Faith (1997), both of which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Her current projects include essays on the shared history of Black and Indigenous Americans and a media experience on humor and racial stereotypes with the Smithsonian Institution.

This event is presented by the Institute for Women’s Studies and the Hargrett Library in partnership with the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts and the UGA Humanities Council. It is a part of the UGA Humanities Festival. It will be followed by reception sponsored by the Hargrett Library.

 

Kaywin FeldmanMar 21 • 5:30 (reception) / 6:30 pm (lecture) • Georgia Museum of Art Auditorium

Kaywin Feldman “Building a National Collection in a Changing Nation”

This lecture by Kaywin Feldman, director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., will honor museum director William U. Eiland on the occasion of his retirement.

Feldman previously led the Minneapolis Institute of Art as its Nivin and Duncan MacMillan Director and President from 2008 to 2019, and directed the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art from 1999 to 2007. She is a member of the board of directors of the Terra Foundation for American Art and a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the White House Historical Association, and the Chipstone Foundation. She is a past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors and past chair of the American Alliance of Museums.

Feldman lectures and publishes widely on many aspects of museums in the 21st century. In 2021 Forbes magazine listed Feldman as one of the “50 Over 50” most visionary women making an impact on society.

This program is presented by the Georgia Museum of Art and the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia public events series.

 

Mar 22 • 4 pm • Virtual Event

Roundtable: “Phillis Wheatley Peters in Material Memory”

In this presentation sponsored by the American Antiquarian Society, archivists and other scholars present materials contextualizing Phillis Wheatley Peters, her world, and her legacies as seen in print artifacts. Participants include AAS vice president for programs Nan Wolverton, Sarah Ruffing Robbins of Texas Christian University, Barbara McCaskill of UGA, and members of the AAS staff.

This event is part of The Genius of Phillis Wheatley Peters: A Poet and Her Legacies, a year-long partnership project by the University of Georgia and TCU on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the 1773 publication of Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. It is also part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Nika ElderMar 23 • 5:30 pm • Georgia Museum of Art

Emerging Scholars Symposium: “Rethinking America: Contemporary Contemplations on American Art”

Keynote Lecture: Nika Elder: “Early American Portraiture and the Value of Flesh”

Addressing works in the collections and exhibitions of the Georgia Museum of Art as well as related works elsewhere, this talk explains how and why early American portraiture has served as a means to negotiate racial identities in both the past and the present. Elder is assistant professor of art history at American University, where she specializes in North American art from the colonial period to the present, including African American art and the history of photography. Her current research and courses examine the mutually constitutive relationship between art and race throughout modern American history. This lecture is supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The 2023 Emerging Scholars Symposium will showcase research by current graduate students and other emerging scholars related to themes of rethinking and reimagining the history of Euro-American, Native American and African American art and material culture through new perspectives. The symposium accompanies the exhibition “Object Lessons in American Art: Selections from the Princeton University Art Museum,” on view February 4 – May 14, 2023, at the Georgia Museum of Art. “Object Lessons” features four centuries of objects from the Princeton University Museum that challenge and explore the traditions and perspectives of American history, society, art and culture. This symposium is presented in partnership with UGA’s Association of Graduate Art Students.

 

 

Full Festival Calendar

 

Meg WeeksMar 15 • 11:30 am • Online event

Meg Weeks: “‘When will we be the ones to decide?’ The Fight to Decriminalize Abortion During Brazil’s Democratic Transition”

Meg Weeks is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Harvard University, with a secondary field in the Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. She is a 2011 magna cum laude graduate of Brown University, where she wrote a prize-winning honors thesis on political organizing and government policy in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. Her research interests include race, gender, labor, and social movements in twentieth-century Latin America, particularly in urban Brazil. Her dissertation focuses on grassroots activism among sex workers and domestic laborers during Brazil’s transition from dictatorship to democracy in the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.

She is also a Portuguese translator and writes widely about art and politics in Latin America, with publications in a number of non-academic journals including Two Lines, Frieze, Artforum, n+1, Revista Rosa, and piauí. Her annotated translation of the memoir of Gabriela Leite, the founder of Brazil’s sex-worker movement, is forthcoming from Duke University Press.

Registration for this event, which will be conducted on Zoom, is available here.

Weeks’s talk is part of “Globalizing Roe: The History and Politics of Abortion Beyond the U.S.,” a speaker series co-sponsored by the department of history’s Gender & History Workshop, the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, and the Institute for Women’s Studies. It is also part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

David BeavanMar 15 • 4 pm • Special Collections Auditorium

David Beavan: “Beyond Digital Humanities: Weaving Humanities, Research Software Engineering and AI”

David Beavan is acting principal research software engineer in the Research Engineering Group (REG) at The Alan Turing Institute, and a research affiliate at the University of Edinburgh Centre for Data, Culture & Society (CDCS).

Beavan has been Research Engineering‘s lead for Accelerating AI in the Arts and Humanities. He has led the Research Engineering Group’s work on Data-centric Engineering projects such as AI for Control Problems, Vehicle Grid Integration and the development of the Data Safe Haven Classification Web App. He is an organizer of the award-winning Turing Data Stories, an open community creating and curating data stories.

He is vice president and trustee of the Society of Research Software Engineering, and is a member of the UKRI Peer Review College, reviewing for both AHRC and ESRC. Beavan has served the digital humanities community as an elected member of the European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH), and was a former co-organizer of the Humanities and Data Science Turing Interest Group.

Prior to joining the Turing Institute, he was associate director for research at the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities (UCLDH) and research manager for the UCL Faculty of Arts & Humanities. He has worked on large-scale projects of international and national importance, such as the Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech and its sibling projects, including the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing, while at the University of Glasgow.

This event is presented by the Willson Center Digital Humanities Lab (DigiLab), the UGA Libraries, and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Founders GardenMarch 15 • 5:30 pm • Founders Garden

Kickoff Reception for the UGA Humanities Festival

A public gathering with refreshments and conversation to introduce the UGA Humanities Festival in its first year, with remarks by Alan Dorsey, Dean of the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

This event is presented by the UGA Humanities Council.

 

 

Ed PavlićMar 16 • 12:30 pm • Athenaeum

Screen Time with Ed Pavlić: “What’s So Special about the Music of ‘Atlanta,’ ‘Insecure,’ ‘I May Destroy You,’ and ‘Queen Sono’?”

The humanities faculty at UGA are piloting a new series on campus featuring accessible talks about TV shows: Screen Time with Your Humanities Professors. The series highlights the sorts of questions and analytical modes that are characteristic of humanistic thinking, while making connections through mutual interests in pop culture. It’s an a.v.-club-slash-humanities spin on UGA’s motto, Et docere et rerum exquirere causas. Talks are about 30 minutes long, with plenty of time for questions and discussion. Free lunch, students of all majors welcome.

In the 1950s, James Baldwin wrote that “it is only in his music that the Negro in America has been able to tell his story.” Back then, Baldwin held that Black musical textures signaled a story “which no American is prepared to hear.” In film and television for the decades that followed, a wide gap yawned, at times howled, between the music and the characters. Midway in the 2010s, however, the gap between music and filmic elements narrowed. In this talk, Professor Ed Pavlić will highlight how Black characters and Black music weave together in unprecedented closeness in four recent series whose nuance and complexity rivals, and at times surpasses, that of our best contemporary writing.

Pavlić is Distinguished Research Professor of English and African American Studies and affiliated faculty in Creative Writing. He teaches classes mainly in modern and contemporary African American and American poetry, fiction, film and music as well as courses in creative writing.

This event is presented by the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Jack DavisMar 16 • 5 pm • Jackson St. Building, Room 125

Jack Davis: Odum Environmental Ethics Lecture – “The Bald Eagle: The History of a Symbol and Species”

Jack Davis is Rothman Family Chair in the Humanities at the University of Florida. He specializes in environmental history and sustainability studies, and is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea (2017). His latest book, The Bald Eagle: The Improbable Journey of America’s Bird (Liveright/W. W. Norton, 2022) was named a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, one of the five best nonfiction books of 2022 by the LA Times, an Amazon Best Book of 2022, and an Apple Best Book of 2022.

Davis was one of the recipients of the 2019 Andrew Carnegie fellowship award. His previous books include Race Against Time: Culture and Separation in Natchez Since 1930 (2001), winner of the Charles S. Sydnor Prize for the best book in southern history, and An Everglades Providence: Marjory Stoneman Douglas and the American Environmental Century (2009), which received a gold medal from the Florida Book Awards.

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program, the College of Environment + Design, and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center‘s Global Georgia public event series.

 

CinéMar 16 • 7:30 pm • CinéLab

Humanities Trivia Night

An evening of humanities-related trivia, prizes, and fun, which teams can enter.

This event is presented by the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

 

Paula KrebsMar 17 • 4 pm • Delta Innovation Hub

Paula Krebs: “The Humanities at Work”

Paula M. Krebs became executive director of the Modern Language Association in August 2017. She administers the programs, governance, and business affairs of the association and is general editor of the association’s publishing and research programs, as well as editor of two association publications.

Krebs previously served as the dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Bridgewater State University. Before arriving at Bridgewater State, she was special assistant to the president for external relations at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, an American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow in the president’s office of the University of Massachusetts, and a professor and department chair at Wheaton. She has also been a regular contributor to higher education publications, including the Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Vitae.

A member of the MLA Executive Council from 2013 to January 2017, Krebs also served on the executive committee of the MLA’s Association of Departments of English (2003–05). She served on the Massachusetts ACE Women’s Network Board of Directors and was a member of the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities Board of Directors from 2009 to 2015.

Krebs earned a PhD in English from Indiana University, where she specialized in Victorian literature and culture, and a BA from La Salle College (now La Salle University).

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia event series.

 

Mar 17 • 7:30 pm • Hendershot’s

Willson Center St. Patrick’s Day celebration with Hog-Eyed Paddy

The Willson Center for Humanities and Arts will host a public celebration of St. Patrick’s Day with Irish music and good cheer at Hendershot’s, which will be free and open to all. Athens duo Hog-Eyed Man will join with multi-instrumentalist Paddy League to form the redoubtable Hog-Eyed Paddy, and to make this a very special evening not to be missed.

Fiddler Jason Cade and multi-instrumentalist Rob McMaken usually record and perform as the acclaimed string duo Hog-Eyed Man, playing the traditional music of the southern Appalachians, including many tunes that crossed the Atlantic from Ireland in the 19th century or even earlier. Both hold a deep appreciation for traditional Irish music. McMaken honed his fiddle-tune chops busking in New Orleans, while Cade lived for many years in both Ireland and New York City, where he played in and led weekly sessions with some of today’s best Irish musicians. In 2005, Cade won the senior fiddle division of the Mid-Atlantic Fleadh, allowing him to compete in the All-Ireland Fleadh, held in County Donegal that year. As Cade and McMaken await the production and release of their fifth Hog-Eyed Man album, they have rekindled the Irish music flame.

Multi-instrumentalist Paddy League grew up in a family of Irish and Greek migrants.  He has performed and recorded with John Doyle, Mick Moloney, Martin Hayes, John Whelan, James Kelly, Susan McKeown, Jerry O’Sullivan, and many other artists on both sides of the Atlantic. He puts an intimate, improvisatory spin on the commonalities between Irish, Scottish, and Quebecois traditions. Paddy is assistant professor of ethnomusicology at Florida State University and director of the Center for Music of the Americas. He plays bodhran, guitar, mandolin, bouzouki, and concertina, among other instruments.

This event is presented by the Willson Center and the UGA Humanities Council as part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Katie IrelandMar 20 • 12:30 pm • DigiLab

Katie Ireland: Book talk – Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World

More details on this event will be available soon.

 

 

Young PlatoMar 20 • 7:30 pm • Ciné

Screening and Conversation: Young Plato

The documentary Young Plato tells the story of Kevin McArevey, the headmaster of an all-boys primary school in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and his novel approach to addressing issues of poverty, inner-city decay, and the legacy of sectarian violence that are deeply embedded in his students’ lives: through the teaching and application of Classical philosophy. By encouraging the students to identify and examine fundamental questions about themselves, each other, and the society into which they were born, McArevey is determined to change their outlook on life, and the future of their community.

The screening will be followed by a conversation and Q&A with Ian Altman, faculty in English and language arts at Clarke Central High School; Aaron Meskin, professor and head of the UGA department of philosophy; and philosophy teaching assistant Rissa Willis.

This event is presented by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the department of philosophy, and the UGA Humanities Council. It is part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia event series.

 

Malinda LoweryMar 21 • 4 pm • Special Collections Auditorium

Malinda Maynor Lowery: Women’s History Month Keynote – “Stories of Lumbee Women”

Malinda Maynor Lowery is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University. She is a historian and documentary film producer who is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. In July 2021 she joined Emory University as the Cahoon Family Professor of American History, after spending 12 years at UNC-Chapel Hill and four years at Harvard University. Her second book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle, was published by UNC Press in 2018. The book is a survey of Lumbee history from the eighteenth century to the present, written for a general audience. Her first book, Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (UNC Press, 2010). It won several awards, including Best First Book of 2010 in Native American and Indigenous Studies.

She has written over twenty book chapters or articles, on topics including American Indian migration and identity, school desegregation, federal recognition, religious music, and foodways, and has published essays for popular audiences in places like the New York Times, Oxford American, and Daily Yonder. She has won fellowships and grants from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Sundance Institute, the Ford Foundation, and others. Films she has produced include the Peabody Award-winning A Chef’s Life (PBS, 2013-2018), Somewhere South (PBS, 2020), Road to Race Day (Crackle, 2020), the Emmy-nominated Private Violence (HBO, 2014), In the Light of Reverence (PBS, 2001), and two short films, Real Indian (1996), and Sounds of Faith (1997), both of which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Her current projects include essays on the shared history of Black and Indigenous Americans and a media experience on humor and racial stereotypes with the Smithsonian Institution.

This event is presented by the Institute for Women’s Studies and the Hargrett Library in partnership with the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts and the UGA Humanities Council. It is a part of the UGA Humanities Festival. It will be followed by reception sponsored by the Hargrett Library.

 

Kaywin FeldmanMar 21 • 5:30 (reception) / 6:30 pm (lecture) • Georgia Museum of Art Auditorium

Kaywin Feldman “Building a National Collection in a Changing Nation”

This lecture by Kaywin Feldman, director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., will honor museum director William U. Eiland on the occasion of his retirement.

Feldman previously led the Minneapolis Institute of Art as its Nivin and Duncan MacMillan Director and President from 2008 to 2019, and directed the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art from 1999 to 2007. She is a member of the board of directors of the Terra Foundation for American Art and a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the White House Historical Association, and the Chipstone Foundation. She is a past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors and past chair of the American Alliance of Museums.

Feldman lectures and publishes widely on many aspects of museums in the 21st century. In 2021 Forbes magazine listed Feldman as one of the “50 Over 50” most visionary women making an impact on society.

This program is presented by the Georgia Museum of Art and the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts as part of the UGA Humanities Festival and the Willson Center’s Global Georgia public events series.

 

Mar 22 • 4 pm • Virtual Event

Roundtable: “Phillis Wheatley Peters in Material Memory”

In this presentation sponsored by the American Antiquarian Society, archivists and other scholars present materials contextualizing Phillis Wheatley Peters, her world, and her legacies as seen in print artifacts. Participants include AAS vice president for programs Nan Wolverton, Sarah Ruffing Robbins of Texas Christian University, Barbara McCaskill of UGA, and members of the AAS staff.

This event is part of The Genius of Phillis Wheatley Peters: A Poet and Her Legacies, a year-long partnership project by the University of Georgia and TCU on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the 1773 publication of Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. It is also part of the UGA Humanities Festival.

 

Nika ElderMar 23 • 5:30 pm • Georgia Museum of Art

Emerging Scholars Symposium: “Rethinking America: Contemporary Contemplations on American Art”

Keynote Lecture: Nika Elder: “Early American Portraiture and the Value of Flesh”

Addressing works in the collections and exhibitions of the Georgia Museum of Art as well as related works elsewhere, this talk explains how and why early American portraiture has served as a means to negotiate racial identities in both the past and the present. Elder is assistant professor of art history at American University, where she specializes in North American art from the colonial period to the present, including African American art and the history of photography. Her current research and courses examine the mutually constitutive relationship between art and race throughout modern American history. This lecture is supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The 2023 Emerging Scholars Symposium will showcase research by current graduate students and other emerging scholars related to themes of rethinking and reimagining the history of Euro-American, Native American and African American art and material culture through new perspectives. The symposium accompanies the exhibition “Object Lessons in American Art: Selections from the Princeton University Art Museum,” on view February 4 – May 14, 2023, at the Georgia Museum of Art. “Object Lessons” features four centuries of objects from the Princeton University Museum that challenge and explore the traditions and perspectives of American history, society, art and culture. This symposium is presented in partnership with UGA’s Association of Graduate Art Students.

 

Georgia Museum of ArtMar 24 • Time TBA • Georgia Museum of Art

Emerging Scholars Symposium: “Rethinking America: Contemporary Contemplations on American Art”

Graduate Student Sessions (full schedule to come)