Calendar

Sep
26
Tue
Roundtable Discussion: “The German Election and Why It Matters”
Sep 26 @ 4:00 pm
Roundtable Discussion: "The German Election and Why It Matters" @ Miller Learning Center, Room 268

A roundtable discussion on the 2016 and 2017 elections in Germany and Europe, sponsored by Transnational European Studies at UGA, the department of Germanic and Slavic studies, and the School for Public and International Affairs. Panelists are Alex Sager of Germanic and Slavic Studies, Markus Crepaz and Cas Mudde of SPIA, and Jan Uelzmann of the School of Modern Languages at Georgia Tech. Refreshments will be provided.

Religion and the Common Good Research Seminar – “Religion Courses, Self-Authorship, and the Pursuit of the Common Good”
Sep 26 @ 7:00 pm
Religion and the Common Good Research Seminar - "Religion Courses, Self-Authorship, and the Pursuit of the Common Good" @ Miller Learning Center, Room 150

This talk will be led by Robert L. Foster. lecturer, department of religion, and Josh Patterson, PhD Student, Institute of Higher Education.

The Religion and the Common Good Seminar is an interdisciplinary initiative that builds on existing networks between faculty, students, community members, and other professionals with research, teaching, and service interests in religion’s contribution to the common good.  The seminar explores the ways religious communities reach beyond the bounds of their own community to benefit people of other faiths or of no particular faith, what constitutes the common good from a religious faith perspective, differences between religions in approaching various common goods, how religions prevent or promote common goods within society or segments of society, religious teachings and practices that motivate members to seek the good of others, and inter-religious service for the common good.

The Religion and the Common Good Seminar is presented by the department of religion with support from the Willson Center.

Sep
29
Fri
Roundtable Discussion with Robin Karson of Library of American Landscape History
Sep 29 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
Roundtable Discussion with Robin Karson of Library of American Landscape History @ Jackson Street Building, Room 112

The College of Environment and Design and the Willson Center present a roundtable discussion with Robin Karson, founder and director of the Library of American Landscape History, a nonprofit publisher of books that advance the study and practice of American landscape architecture, located in Amherst, Massachusetts. Among her publications are Fletcher Steele, Landscape Architect; The Muses of Gwinn; and A Genius for Place; two  multi-author works, Pioneers of American Landscape Design and Warren Manning, Landscape Architect and Environmental Planner; and many articles about American landscapes of the early twentieth century.

Karson has organized several traveling exhibitions and, since 2012,  has been executive producer for several short documentary films including The Best Planned City in the World, recipient of the prestigious Film Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. Her written work has been recognized with awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects, the American Horticultural Society, the Foundation for Landscape Studies, and the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art. In 2017 she was made an Honorary Member of the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Library of American Landscape History is the leading publisher of books that advance the study and practice of American landscape architecture—from gardens and parks to city plans. LALH books educate the public, motivating stewardship of significant places and the environment, and they inspire new designs that connect people with nature.

Sep
30
Sat
“Sharing Our Stories” – Digitizing and Recording Opportunities at the Briar Patch Arts Festival
Sep 30 all-day
“Sharing Our Stories” - Digitizing and Recording Opportunities at the Briar Patch Arts Festival @ Courthouse Lawn, Eatonton, GA | Eatonton | Georgia | United States

“Sharing Our Stories” is an academic and community initiative funded by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities and guided by Christopher Lawton, director of experiential learning for Putnam County Schools and director of the Georgia Virtual History Project. It a partnership initiative of the Willson Center, the Putnam County Charter School District, the GVHP, and the Georgia Writers Museum.

The project is part of an ongoing effort to involve the Putnam County community in telling its own stories, both as context for, and document of, this crucial American literary landscape which gave birth to both Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker.

Community members are invited to bring old photographs and documents to be digitally scanned, and life stories to be recorded, by carefully trained teams of Putnam County High School students and faculty. Participants will receive a digital copy of each photo and document they bring, or recording they make, as well as an archival sleeve to keep their original materials safe. Digital copies and recordings will also be used in creating a new curriculum to teach Putnam County students about their history of the place they call home.

Additional partners for this event are the Butler-Baker Alumni Project, Eatonton Main Street, the Briar Patch Arts Council, the Uncle Remus Museum, the Eatonton-Putnam Historical Society, the Putnam County NAACP, and the Old School History Museum.

Common Heritage – the NEH grant program that will aid the “Sharing Our Stories” project – is intended to “support both the digitization of cultural heritage materials and the organization of public programming at community events that explore these materials as a window on a community’s history and culture.”

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

 

Oct
4
Wed
Screening and Discussion – “Chasing Coral”
Oct 4 @ 6:00 pm
Screening and Discussion - "Chasing Coral" @ Tate Student Center Theater | Athens | Georgia | United States
Chasing Coral follows a team of divers, photographers, and scientists as they set out to discover why coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. The film features world-renowned coral research conducted at the University of Georgia. Following the screening, a panel discussion will be held with the filmmakers and key film subjects, including Jim Porter, UGA professor and coral ecologist in the Odum School of Ecology, and Zack Rago, the “coral nerd.” 

The event is part of a larger project to engage the Athens public about the importance of healthy oceans. During the filmmakers’ visit, local area high schools will participate in field trips to see the film and meet the filmmakers, taking part in educational activities on ecology, marine science, and ocean health. 

Financial support for this project comes from Kirbo Charitable Foundation, Reef Ball Foundation, ECOGIG Research Consortium at UGA’s Department of Marine Sciences, Peabody Media Center, Katherine and Bertis Downs, Odum School of Ecology, and Willson Center. Additional promotional support was provided by UGA’s Speak Out for Species club, UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant. The field trip series was developed in partnership with the Clarke County School District.

Chasing Coral won the Audience Award
for the U.S. Documentary category at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. A trailer for the film can be viewed here.
Oct
5
Thu
The U.S. in the First World War: Lynn Dumenil – “Modern American Women and World War I”
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm
The U.S. in the First World War: Lynn Dumenil - "Modern American Women and World War I" @ Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium | Athens | Georgia | United States

Lynn Dumenil will give a talk on “Modern American Women and World War I” as part of The U.S. in the First World War, a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center.

Lynn Dumenil is the Robert Glass Cleland Professor of American History, Emerita at Occidental College. She is the author of The Second Line of Defense: American Women and World War IThe Modern Temper: American Culture and Society in the 1920sFreemasonry and American Culture, 1880-1930Through Women’s Eyes: An American History (with Ellen Carol DuBois), and (with James Henretta and David Brody) America’s History, 5th edition; and America: A Concise History. Dumenil’s emphasis is cultural, political and social history of 20th century America.

Oct
13
Fri
Cinema Roundtable – “1967: How ‘The Graduate’ and ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ Changed Hollywood”
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm
Cinema Roundtable - "1967: How 'The Graduate' and 'Bonnie and Clyde' Changed Hollywood" @ Fine Arts Building, Balcony Theatre (Room 400)

It is now 50 years since 1967, a year that marked major shifts in Hollywood storytelling and censorship. Two lower-budget “youth pix,” The Graduate and Bonnie and Clyde, led the way, proving there was a big audience for new, daring content. Both films exploited elements from modern European Art Cinema to update American cinema with their radical themes, stunning visual style, and popular music scores. They also challenged the outdated Hollywood censorship and ratings system. This roundtable assesses the stories, styles, and historical significance of these two movies for the 1960s and beyond.

Panelists include Matthew Bernstein and Michele Schreiber, both of Film and Media Studies at Emory, as well as Christopher Sieving and Richard Neupert from Film Studies at UGA. Neupert will moderate the panel and leads discussion with the audience. The Roundtable is free and open to the public.

Zanele Muholi and Amelie Klein – A Conversation on “Making Africa”
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm
Zanele Muholi and Amelie Klein - A Conversation on “Making Africa” @ Lamar Dodd School of Art, room S151 | Athens | Georgia | United States

The Willson Center will partner with the High Museum in Atlanta to host a conversation with photographer Zanele Muholi and curator Amelie Klein of the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. The event is in conjunction with Making Africa: A Continent of Contemporary Design, an exhibit curated by Klein on display at the High Museum from October 15, 2017–January 7, 2018.

The High Museum of Art will be the first venue in the United States to present this major touring exhibition, which offers a fresh look at African design through a myriad of diverse works by more than 120 artists. Ranging from playful to provocative to political, the works include sculpture, prints, fashion, furniture, film, photography, apps, maps, digital comics, and more. The exhibition offers a vision of Africa in the twenty-first century as a place of unbounded optimism, rapid growth, and massive cultural transformation and presents the continent as a hub of experimentation that generates innovative design approaches and solutions with worldwide relevance. Making Africa focuses on a generation of entrepreneurs, thinkers, and designers from and within Africa who address a global audience and provide the world with a new vantage point on their continent. The exhibition also illustrates how the artists use their work to effect significant economic, social, and political change.

 

Oct
14
Sat
Exhibition – “Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête”
Oct 14 2017 – Jan 7 2018 all-day
Exhibition - "Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête" @ Georgia Museum of Art

This exhibition of more than 40 works by the acclaimed African American artist Mickalene Thomas also includes a selection of works by artists who inspired her: Derrick Adams, Renée Cox, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Lyle Ashton Harris, Deana Lawson, Zanele Muholi, Malick Sidibé, Xaviera Simmons, Hank Willis Thomas and Carrie Mae Weems. Thomas is well known for her paintings encrusted with rhinestones, but she has worked in photography since she was a graduate student at Yale more than two decades ago. Her photographs draw on a wide range of influences — from art history to popular culture, from Henri Matisse’s odalisques to images of 1970s supermodel Beverly Johnson — but they all focus on beauty and what it means to be a woman.

The exhibition is organized by Aperture Foundation, New York, and curated in-house by Shawnya Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art.

It is sponsored by the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Inc., the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation, the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art, and the Willson Center.

The following events will be associated with the exhibition:

Friday, October 13, 2017
90 Carlton: Fall
5:30-8:30 pm
The Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art present a reception featuring the fall exhibitions which will include a sneak preview of the exhibition Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and its companion, tête-à-tête. Enjoy light refreshments, gallery activities, door prizes and “Ask the Experts” from 7 to 8 p.m. Event Partners: Athens Printing Company, Barron’s Rental Center and Epting Events. $5, free for members. Become a member of the museum at the event for complimentary admission. RSVP to gmoarsvp@uga.edu or by calling 706.542.4199. Register at http://bit.ly/90c-summer17.

Friday, October 20, 2017
Conversations on Muses
Women’s Studies Friday Speaker Series
12:20 -1:10 pm

This fall, the Women’s Studies Friday Speaker Series will highlight the exhibition, Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête through a gallery tour and discussion led by curator Dr. Shawnya Harris in collaboration with the UGA departments of Women’s Studies and African-American Studies. The event is free, open to the public, and an opportunity for students and faculty, including First Year Odyssey.

Thursday, October 26, 2017
Film Night
7:00- 9:00 pm
Directed by Filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris, Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People is the first documentary to reveal photography’s role in shaping the cultural identity of African Americans from slavery to the present era. The documentary is in part inspired by the work of photo historian Deborah Willis and features the work of distinguished historical photographers such as James Van Der Zee and Gordon Parks as well as numerous contemporary photographers including Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Hank Willis Thomas who are also featured in the Georgia Museum of Art’s presentation of Mickalene Thomas’s Muse.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Tour at Two
2:00- 3:00 pm
Join Shawnya Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art, for a tour of the exhibition Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête.

Thursday, November 9, 2017
Teen Studio: Mickalene Thomas
5:30-8:30 pm
Teens ages 13-18 are invited to this studio-based workshop led by local artist and educator Kristen Bach. The group will spend time in the galleries exploring the work of contemporary artist Mickalene Thomas in the exhibition “Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête.” Drawing inspiration from Thomas’ work, teens will create their own mixed media works of art using photography and collage. Includes a pizza dinner. This program is free, but space is limited. Please email sagekincaid@uga.edu or call 706.542.0448 to reserve a spot.

“Sharing Our Stories” – Digitizing and Recording Opportunities at the Butler-Baker Alumni Project’s Octoberfest Celebration
Oct 14 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm
“Sharing Our Stories” - Digitizing and Recording Opportunities at the Butler-Baker Alumni Project’s Octoberfest Celebration @  Butler-Baker School | Eatonton | Georgia | United States

“Sharing Our Stories” is an academic and community initiative funded by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities and guided by Christopher Lawton, director of experiential learning for Putnam County Schools and director of the Georgia Virtual History Project. It a partnership initiative of the Willson Center, the Putnam County Charter School District, the GVHP, and the Georgia Writers Museum.

The project is part of an ongoing effort to involve the Putnam County community in telling its own stories, both as context for, and document of, this crucial American literary landscape which gave birth to both Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker.

Community members are invited to bring old photographs and documents to be digitally scanned, and life stories to be recorded, by carefully trained teams of Putnam County High School students and faculty. Participants will receive a digital copy of each photo and document they bring, or recording they make, as well as an archival sleeve to keep their original materials safe. Digital copies and recordings will also be used in creating a new curriculum to teach Putnam County students about their history of the place they call home.

Additional partners for this event are the Butler-Baker Alumni Project, Eatonton Main Street, the Briar Patch Arts Council, the Uncle Remus Museum, the Eatonton-Putnam Historical Society, the Putnam County NAACP, and the Old School History Museum.

Common Heritage – the NEH grant program that will aid the “Sharing Our Stories” project – is intended to “support both the digitization of cultural heritage materials and the organization of public programming at community events that explore these materials as a window on a community’s history and culture.”

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.