Calendar Holding page

Apr
23
Mon
Scott MacKenzie – “The Scarcities of Udolpho”
Apr 23 @ 4:45 pm
Scott MacKenzie - "The Scarcities of Udolpho" @ Park Hall, Rm 265

In a 1780 parliamentary speech, “On Economical Reform,” Edmund Burke asserts that the British royal household “has lost all that was stately and venerable in the antique manners, without retrenching anything of the cumbrous charge of a Gothic establishment” and is populated by “grim spectres of departed tyrants—the Saxon, the Norman, and the Dane; the stern Edwards and fierce Henries—who stalk from desolation to desolation, through the dreary vacuity, and melancholy succession of chill and comfortless chambers.” The proposed reforms that Burke introduced with that speech included efforts to replace the household as personal institution with modern impersonal systems of governance. This talk will argue that Ann Radcliffe’s narratives (particularly The Mysteries of Udolpho) enact a kind of household reform/modernization that is homologous to what Burke pursues, and that also catches the oikos/household in its transmutation from a slightly-less-figural component of pre- and proto-capitalist systems (which in many respects actually were households) to the deep oikos metaphor in the circuitry of full-fledged capitalist for whichhome might be a better synonym.

Scott MacKenzie (Associate Professor, University of British Columbia) specializes in Eighteenth-Century Studies. His first book Be It Ever So Humble: Poverty, Fiction, and the Invention of the Middle-Class Home (U of Virginia Press, 2013) won the Walker Cowen Prize for a study on an eighteenth-century topic. The book argues that fiction and discourse about poverty in Britain in the later eighteenth century collaborate to invent modern private domesticity and the first occupants of home — at least conceptually — are the poor rather than the middle-classes, who rapidly appropriate home for themselves. MacKenzie has published articles in Eighteenth-Century FictionELHEighteenth-Century Studies, and PMLA.

The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature is supported by the Willson Center and by the English Department’s Rodney Baine Lecture Fund. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Apr
24
Tue
Deanna Kreisel – “The Future and its Discontents: Eco-Time in Three Victorian Texts”
Apr 24 @ 4:45 pm
Deanna Kreisel - "The Future and its Discontents: Eco-Time in Three Victorian Texts" @ Park Hall, Rm 265

The question of how (or why, or whether) to commingle queer theory and ecocriticism has become an urgent concern for many theorists writing in the wake of Timothy Morton’s 2010 PMLA essay “Queer Ecology.” While Greg Garrard, for example, thinks that queer theory needs ecocriticism in order to avoid theoretical bankruptcy and irrelevance, Jordy Rosenberg argues exactly the opposite, warning that certain versions of eco-theory are guilty of promulgating “a primitivist fantasy that hinges on the violent erasure of the social: the conjuring of a realm—an ‘ancestral realm’—that exists in the present, but in parallax to historical time.”  This talk will develop Rosenberg’s analysis by taking up the question of eco-queer futurity in three emblematic Victorian texts: Emily Bronte’s 1847 novel Wuthering Heights, Matthew Arnold’s 1867 poem “Dover Beach,” and Gerard Manley Hopkins’s “Binsey Poplars” (1879).  Each of these works embodies an iteration of queerness that simultaneously challenges the hegemony of reproductive futurism described by theorists Leo Bersani and Lee Edelman and disavows the utopianist collectivity of much recent queer studies scholarship.

This talk will aim to demonstrate how eco-queer readings of these works can illuminate the clashing temporal and spatial scales at work in their deep logic, and thereby draw out their conflicted investment in nascent ideologies of economic and environmental stewardship.

Deanna Kreisel (Associate Professor, University of British Columbia) specializes in Victorian literature and culture. Her first book, Economic Woman: Demand, Gender, and Narrative Closure in Eliot and Hardy (Toronto 2012), examines how images of feminized sexuality in the mid-Victorian realist novel reflected widespread contemporary anxieties about the growth of capitalism. Kreisel is co-founder of Vcologies, an international working group of nineteenth-centuryist scholars interested in ecocriticism and environmental studies. She has published articles in PMLAVictorian StudiesRepresentations, and ELH, and is currently at work on a new book on the history of the sustainability concept and utopianism in the nineteenth century.

The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature is supported by the Willson Center and by the English Department’s Rodney Baine Lecture Fund. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Apr
25
Wed
A Conversation Between Sheffield Hale and Wayne Flynt – “The Authentic Harper Lee: Letters and Stories from a Quarter-Century Friendship”
Apr 25 @ 5:00 pm
A Conversation Between Sheffield Hale and Wayne Flynt - "The Authentic Harper Lee: Letters and Stories from a  Quarter-Century Friendship" @ Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium

Wayne Flynt, professor emeritus in the department of history at Auburn University, is the author of eleven books, and one of the most recognized and honored scholars of Southern history, politics, and religion. His latest, published in 2017, is Mockingbird Songs: My Friendship with Harper Lee. He has also published his memoir Keeping the Faith: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives, in which he writes about his experiences in the Civil Rights movement.

Sheffield Hale is president and CEO of the Atlanta History Center. Prior to joining the Atlanta History Center in 2012 he served as chief counsel of the American Cancer Society, Inc. and was a partner practicing corporate law in the firm of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP. Hale serves as a trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Robert W. Woodruff Library of Atlanta University Center, Fox Theatre, Inc., the Buckhead Coalition, the Midtown Alliance, and Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau. He is a past chair of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, the Atlanta History Center, St. Jude’s Recovery Center, Inc., and the State of Georgia’s Judicial Nominating Commission. Hale received his B.A. in history from the University of Georgia summa cum laude in 1982, and received his J.D. in 1985 from the University of Virginia School of Law. He is a member of the American Law Institute.

The event is presented by the Willson Center, the University of Georgia Press, and the University of Georgia Libraries.

 

Apr
27
Fri
Nick Groom – “Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein,’ Polidori’s ‘The Vampyre’, and the Nature of Being”
Apr 27 @ 11:30 am
Nick Groom - "Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein,' Polidori's 'The Vampyre', and the Nature of Being" @ Park Hall Library

Nick Groom is professor of English literature at the University of Exeter, an author on subjects ranging from the history of the Union Jack to Thomas Chatterton, has edited several books and regularly appears on television, radio and at literary festivals as an authority on English Literature, seasonal customs, J. R. R. Tolkien, the “Gothic” and “British” and “English” identities. Due to his extensive work on the Gothic, especially on the history of vampires, he has become known as the “Prof of Goth” in the media and has written several articles on the Goth scene, including essays on the singer Nick Cave.

His books include The Union Jack: The Story of the British Flag (2006), The Gothic: A Very Short Introduction (2012), and The Seasons: An Elegy for the Passing of the Year (2013). He co-edited the 2017 collection Coastal Works: Cultures of the Atlantic Edge with Jos Smith and Willson Center Director Nicholas Allen, and he is the editor of the forthcoming 2018 anniversary edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein from Oxford University Press.