Calendar

Dec
1
Fri
“Always (K)new” – Theatrical Performance
Dec 1 @ 7:30 pm
"Always (K)new" - Theatrical Performance @ Seney-Stovall Chapel  | Athens | Georgia | United States

Always (K)new is an original cross-cultural theatrical oral history project that draws from stories of LGBTQ individuals collected in Georgia, Colombia, and Brazil. It is being developed in collaboration with Alberto Tibaji, an internationally recognized theatre artist from Brazil who specializes in using autobiographical techniques in devising original movement/text pieces drawn from personal narratives. The Willson Center, the Latin American Caribbean Studies Institute, the Portuguese Flagship Program, the department of theatre and film studies, and the LGBT Resource Center are collaborating to bring Tibaji to campus for a 10-week artistic residency this fall.

“This piece is not theatrical storytelling in the traditional sense,” observed Professor George Contini of the department of theatre and film studies. “The stories we’ve collected provided an amazing wealth of images, anecdotes, and emotions around the issues of gender and identity.  Always (K)new serves to weave them as a tapestry. But similar to the very formation of identity, sometimes the words and images sync and other times they repel one another.”

In describing his work, Tibaji stated that through engaging with autobiographical techniques he is became convinced of their significance to both theatre and human rights activism. “The importance of real narratives in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights is undeniable but it is also important to fight for the formation of a new sensibility that can inspire respect for diversity in a broader sense and can queer traditional ways of telling life stories in theatre.”

Performances will be held Dec. 1 and Dec. 2 at 7.30 p.m. They are free and open to the public.

A panel discussion with Tibaji and others on Nov. 15 will examine the unique process being used in creating Always (K)new.

Dec
2
Sat
“Always (K)new” – Theatrical Performance
Dec 2 @ 7:30 pm
"Always (K)new" - Theatrical Performance @ Seney-Stovall Chapel  | Athens | Georgia | United States

Always (K)new is an original cross-cultural theatrical oral history project that draws from stories of LGBTQ individuals collected in Georgia, Colombia, and Brazil. It is being developed in collaboration with Alberto Tibaji, an internationally recognized theatre artist from Brazil who specializes in using autobiographical techniques in devising original movement/text pieces drawn from personal narratives. The Willson Center, the Latin American Caribbean Studies Institute, the Portuguese Flagship Program, the department of theatre and film studies, and the LGBT Resource Center are collaborating to bring Tibaji to campus for a 10-week artistic residency this fall.

“This piece is not theatrical storytelling in the traditional sense,” observed Professor George Contini of the department of theatre and film studies. “The stories we’ve collected provided an amazing wealth of images, anecdotes, and emotions around the issues of gender and identity.  Always (K)new serves to weave them as a tapestry. But similar to the very formation of identity, sometimes the words and images sync and other times they repel one another.”

In describing his work, Tibaji stated that through engaging with autobiographical techniques he is became convinced of their significance to both theatre and human rights activism. “The importance of real narratives in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights is undeniable but it is also important to fight for the formation of a new sensibility that can inspire respect for diversity in a broader sense and can queer traditional ways of telling life stories in theatre.”

Performances will be held Dec. 1 and Dec. 2 at 7.30 p.m. They are free and open to the public.

A panel discussion with Tibaji and others on Nov. 15 will examine the unique process being used in creating Always (K)new.

Jan
19
Fri
Elizabeth Popp Berman – Lecture
Jan 19 @ 3:30 pm
Elizabeth Popp Berman - Lecture @ MLC Room 213
Elizabeth Popp Berman is an associate professor of sociology at the University at Albany, SUNY, working at the intersection of economic sociology, the sociology of knowledge, and science and technology studies. Most of her work focuses on recent U.S. history (1960s to 1980s) and emphasizes the role of public policy.
 
She will be presenting research from her main current project, a book entitled Thinking Like an Economist: How Economics Became the Language of U.S. Public Policy (under contract with Princeton University Press). Her talk is part of the Georgia Workshop on Culture, Power and History.
Jan
22
Mon
Brian Losch – “Recording Live Orchestra for Broadcast: Multiple Concerts, Edits, and Live Mix Using Pyramix Digital Audio Workstation Software”
Jan 22 @ 5:30 pm
Brian Losch - "Recording Live Orchestra for Broadcast: Multiple Concerts, Edits, and Live Mix Using Pyramix Digital Audio Workstation Software” @ Edge Recital Hall, Hugh Hodgson School of Music

Making recordings for Sony Masterworks, EMI, Deutsche Grammophon, Decca, and The Metropolitan Opera, Brian Losch has production credits which span multiple genres and include artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer, Chris Thile, Stuart Duncan, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and the New York Philharmonic. As an engineer, he has worked on film scores for The American Boychoir and ESPN Films, broadcasts for Metropolitan Opera HD, San Francisco Ballet, and the New York Philharmonic with guests including Tony Bennett, Celine Dion, and Andrea Bocelli.

Losch has received a Grammy Award (Best Engineered Album, Classical) for Winter Morning Walks, two Grammy Certificates of Participation (Best Folk Album and Best Engineered Album, Non- classical) for his work on The Goat Rodeo Sessions, a Certificate of Participation for work on Steven Mackey’s Grammy-award winning Lonely Motel, and Downbeat Awards for his studio and live recordings. As an engineer, he has worked on a variety of respected music productions and continues to do so in New York City.

Feb
2
Fri
Robert Hopkins – “TBA”
Feb 2 @ 3:31 pm
Robert Hopkins - "TBA" @ Peabody Hall, 115

Robert Hopkins is a professor and chair of the department of philosophy at NYU. His research is mostly in the philosophy of mind and aesthetics. He has worked on pictorial representation and picture perception (the subject of a book, Picture, Image and Experience, 1998), on other topics central to the philosophy of the visual arts, including the aesthetics of sculpture, photography, painting and film; and on other mental states that relate in interesting ways to our perception of pictures: perception itself, experiential imagining, and episodic memory. He’s also written on the epistemology and metaphysical status of aesthetic and moral judgement.

Work on these topics has appeared in various journals, including Mind, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Nous, Journal of Philosophy and Philosophical Review. In 2001 he was awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize in recognition of his research. For several years he was honorary secretary of the Mind Association. He is current president of the European Society for Aesthetics.

Feb
8
Thu
Global Georgia Initiative: Qiu Xiaolong – Reading and Conversation: “A Chinese Cop in the Global Age” – Betty Jean Craige Lecture in Comparative Literature
Feb 8 @ 4:00 pm
Global Georgia Initiative: Qiu Xiaolong - Reading and Conversation: "A Chinese Cop in the Global Age" - Betty Jean Craige Lecture in Comparative Literature @ Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium | Athens | Georgia | United States

Qiu Xiaolong was born in Shanghai, China. He published prize-winning poetry, translation and criticism in Chinese in the eighties, and became a member of the Chinese Writers’ Association. In 1988, he came to the United States as a Ford Foundation Fellow, started writing in English, and obtained a Ph.D. in comparative literature at Washington University.

He is the author of Death of a Red Heroine (2000), A Loyal Character Dancer (2002), When Red Is Black (2004), A Case of Two Cities (2006), Red Mandarin Dress (2007), The Mao Case (2009), Don’t Cry, Tai Lake (2012), Enigma of China (2013), Shanghai Redemption (2015), and Becoming Inspector Chen (in French and Italian, 2016 and 2017) in the critically acclaimed, award-winning Inspector Chen series; a collection of linked stories Years of Red Dust (first serialized in Le Monde, 2010); three poetry translations, Treasury of Chinese Love Poems (2003), Evoking T’ang (2007) and 100 Classic Chinese Poems (2010); and his own poetry collections, Lines Around China (2003) and Poems of Inspector Chen (2016).

Qiu’s books have sold over two million copies worldwide and have been published in 20 languages. He currently lives in St. Louis with his wife and daughter.

The event will include readings by Qiu and a conversation with Nicholas Allen, Franklin Professor of English and director of the Willson Center. It is presented as the Department of Comparative Literature’s annual Betty Jean Craige Lecture. Betty Jean Craige is University Professor Emerita of Comparative Literature and a former director of the Willson Center.

The Global Georgia Initiative presents global problems in local context with a focus on how the arts and humanities can intervene. The series is made possible by the support of private individuals and the Willson Center Board of Friends.

Feb
12
Mon
Shu-mei Shih – “Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature.”
Feb 12 @ 5:00 pm
Shu-mei Shih - “Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature.”

Shu-mei Shih is a professor of comparative literature, Asian languages and cultures, and Asian American studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among other works, her book, Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations Across the Pacific (2007), has been attributed as having inaugurated a new field of study called Sinophone Studies. Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (2013) is a textbook that she co-edited for the field.

Besides Sinophone studies, her areas of research include comparative modernism, as in the book The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937 (2001); theories of transnationalism, as in her co-edited Minor Transnationalism (2005); critical race studies, as in her guest-edited special issue of PMLA entitled “Comparative Racialization” (2008); critical theory, as in her co-edited Creolization of Theory (2011); Taiwan studies, as in her guest-edited special issue of Postcolonial Studies entitled “Globalization and Taiwan’s (In)significance” and the co-edited volume Comparatizing Taiwan (2015) and Knowledge Taiwan (2016).

She is currently working on two monographs entitled Empires of the Sinophone and Comparison as Relation, and two co-edited volumes: Keywords of Taiwan Theory and World Studies: Theories and Debates.

Feb
20
Tue
Religion and Common Good Seminar – “Demonized No More: Spiritual Journeys and Spaces of Black Gay and Bisexual Men in College”
Feb 20 @ 7:00 pm
Religion and Common Good Seminar - "Demonized No More: Spiritual Journeys and Spaces of Black Gay and Bisexual Men in College" @ TBD

This talk will be led by Darris Means, associate professor, College of Education.

The Religion and the Common Good Seminar is an interdisciplinary initiative that builds on existing networks between faculty, students, community members, and other professionals with research, teaching, and service interests in religion’s contribution to the common good.  The seminar explores the ways religious communities reach beyond the bounds of their own community to benefit people of other faiths or of no particular faith, what constitutes the common good from a religious faith perspective, differences between religions in approaching various common goods, how religions prevent or promote common goods within society or segments of society, religious teachings and practices that motivate members to seek the good of others, and inter-religious service for the common good.

The Religion and the Common Good Seminar is presented by the department of religion with support from the Willson Center.

 

Feb
22
Thu
Global Georgia Initiative: Willson Center / Grady College Conversation – “Journalism and the Contemporary South”
Feb 22 @ 4:00 pm
Global Georgia Initiative: Willson Center / Grady College Conversation - "Journalism and the Contemporary South" @ UGA Chapel | Statesboro | Georgia | United States

Join us for a conversation on journalism in the contemporary South with six panelists with national experience in the modern media and the challenges they face in telling the stories that speak to a tumultuous time.

  • Eliza Borné, editor, Oxford American
  • Valerie Boyd, professor, UGA Grady College of Journalism
  • Richard Fausset, Atlanta bureau chief, The New York Times (moderator)
  • Alysia Nicole Harris, editor, Scalawag
  • Pete McCommons, editor & publisher, Flagpole
  • Chuck Reece, editor in chief, The Bitter Southerner

 

The event is co-sponsored by the Willson Center and the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. Dean Charles Davis of the Grady College will introduce the discussion.

The Willson Center’s Global Georgia Initiative presents global problems in local context with a focus on how the arts and humanities can intervene. The series is made possible by the support of private individuals and the Willson Center Board of Friends.

 

Jessica Silbey – “The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property”
Feb 22 @ 4:00 pm
Jessica Silbey - "The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property" @ Venue TBD

Jessica Silbey, professor at the Northeastern University School of Law, is a leading scholar and nationally recognized expert on intellectual property and the use of film to communicate about law. Silbey has altered the national conversation about creativity and invention with her recent book, The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property (Stanford University Press). Based on a set of 50 interviews with authors, artists, inventors and lawyers, Silbey’s work challenges the traditional notion of intellectual property as merely creating financial incentives necessary to spur innovation. Drawing on her interdisciplinary background and qualitative empirical training, Silbey’s research sheds new light onto the roles intellectual property law play to sustain and frustrate the creative and innovative communities in the work they seek to accomplish.

Silbey earned her law degree as well as her PhD in comparative literature from the University of Michigan. She served as law clerk to Judge Robert E. Keeton of the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts and Judge Levin H. Campbell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. She also spent three years in private law practice, focusing on intellectual property and reproductive rights.

Silbey is co-editor of the book Law and Justice on the Small Screen (with Peter Robson) and author of numerous law review articles and publications in other venues. In addition to her research on intellectual property, Silbey writes about the use of film as a legal tool (body cams, surveillance video, medical imaging) and the representations of law in popular culture (courtroom dramas, reality television). She is an affiliate fellow at Yale’s Information Society Project and a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In January 2016, Silbey was elected chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) national Section on Intellectual Property and appointed to serve on the AALS Presidential Conference Film Committee. She currently serves as co-chair of the New England Chapter for the Copyright Society of the United States.