Calendar

Oct
14
Sat
Exhibition – “Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête”
Oct 14 2017 – Jan 7 2018 all-day
Exhibition - "Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête" @ Georgia Museum of Art

This exhibition of more than 40 works by the acclaimed African American artist Mickalene Thomas also includes a selection of works by artists who inspired her: Derrick Adams, Renée Cox, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Lyle Ashton Harris, Deana Lawson, Zanele Muholi, Malick Sidibé, Xaviera Simmons, Hank Willis Thomas and Carrie Mae Weems. Thomas is well known for her paintings encrusted with rhinestones, but she has worked in photography since she was a graduate student at Yale more than two decades ago. Her photographs draw on a wide range of influences — from art history to popular culture, from Henri Matisse’s odalisques to images of 1970s supermodel Beverly Johnson — but they all focus on beauty and what it means to be a woman.

The exhibition is organized by Aperture Foundation, New York, and curated in-house by Shawnya Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art.

It is sponsored by the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Inc., the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation, the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art, and the Willson Center.

The following events will be associated with the exhibition:

Friday, October 13, 2017
90 Carlton: Fall
5:30-8:30 pm
The Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art present a reception featuring the fall exhibitions which will include a sneak preview of the exhibition Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and its companion, tête-à-tête. Enjoy light refreshments, gallery activities, door prizes and “Ask the Experts” from 7 to 8 p.m. Event Partners: Athens Printing Company, Barron’s Rental Center and Epting Events. $5, free for members. Become a member of the museum at the event for complimentary admission. RSVP to gmoarsvp@uga.edu or by calling 706.542.4199. Register at http://bit.ly/90c-summer17.

Friday, October 20, 2017
Conversations on Muses
Women’s Studies Friday Speaker Series
12:20 -1:10 pm

This fall, the Women’s Studies Friday Speaker Series will highlight the exhibition, Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête through a gallery tour and discussion led by curator Dr. Shawnya Harris in collaboration with the UGA departments of Women’s Studies and African-American Studies. The event is free, open to the public, and an opportunity for students and faculty, including First Year Odyssey.

Thursday, October 26, 2017
Film Night
7:00- 9:00 pm
Directed by Filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris, Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People is the first documentary to reveal photography’s role in shaping the cultural identity of African Americans from slavery to the present era. The documentary is in part inspired by the work of photo historian Deborah Willis and features the work of distinguished historical photographers such as James Van Der Zee and Gordon Parks as well as numerous contemporary photographers including Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Hank Willis Thomas who are also featured in the Georgia Museum of Art’s presentation of Mickalene Thomas’s Muse.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Tour at Two
2:00- 3:00 pm
Join Shawnya Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art, for a tour of the exhibition Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête.

Thursday, November 9, 2017
Teen Studio: Mickalene Thomas
5:30-8:30 pm
Teens ages 13-18 are invited to this studio-based workshop led by local artist and educator Kristen Bach. The group will spend time in the galleries exploring the work of contemporary artist Mickalene Thomas in the exhibition “Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête.” Drawing inspiration from Thomas’ work, teens will create their own mixed media works of art using photography and collage. Includes a pizza dinner. This program is free, but space is limited. Please email sagekincaid@uga.edu or call 706.542.0448 to reserve a spot.

Dec
1
Fri
Susan DeWitt Smith – Piano Recital
Dec 1 @ 6:30 pm
Susan DeWitt Smith - Piano Recital @ Edge Recital Hall, Hugh Hodgson School of Music

Pianist Susan DeWitt Smith is associate professor of music, director of piano, and theory coordinator at Lewis & Clark.

A native of Portland, Oregon, Smith has an active career as both a soloist and chamber musician. She has performed as a soloist with the Oregon Symphony, and on subscription series with the San Diego Symphony, San Diego Chamber Orchestra, Palomar Symphony and the Dartmouth Symphony.

A co-founder of the Nelson Chamber Music Festival in New Zealand, Smith is highly regarded as a chamber musician and has performed at festivals throughout the country, with musicians who include members of the Juilliard, Kronos, and Philadelphia string quartets. She has performed at the Bloch, Cascade Head and the Cascade music festivals in Oregon, as well as the Grand Teton, Hot Springs, and Olympic music festivals.

An enthusiastic and committed proponent of music education, she co-founded the innovative and highly successful Music in Context series in 2005. A graduate of Dartmouth College, she earned her MM from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and her Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the Eastman School of Music. She is a member of Portland’s Third Angle New Music Ensemble, and has recorded extensively on the KOCH International Classics label.

 

Concert Program

 

J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Partita in Bb Major, BWV 825

   Praeludium

   Allemande                 

   Corrente

   Sarabande

   Menuet I, II

   Gigue

 

Michael Johanson

Rhapsody

 

Samuel Barber (1910-1981)

Excursions, Op 20

  I. Un poco allegro

II. In slow blues tempo

III. Allegretto

IV.Allegro molto

 

Frederic Chopin (1810-1849)

Nocturne in Db Major, Op 27, No. 2

Waltz in C# minor, Op 64, No. 2

Ballade in g minor, Op 23

“Always (K)new” – Theatrical Performance
Dec 1 @ 7:30 pm
"Always (K)new" - Theatrical Performance @ Seney-Stovall Chapel  | Athens | Georgia | United States

Always (K)new is an original cross-cultural theatrical oral history project that draws from stories of LGBTQ individuals collected in Georgia, Colombia, and Brazil. It is being developed in collaboration with Alberto Tibaji, an internationally recognized theatre artist from Brazil who specializes in using autobiographical techniques in devising original movement/text pieces drawn from personal narratives. The Willson Center, the Latin American Caribbean Studies Institute, the Portuguese Flagship Program, the department of theatre and film studies, and the LGBT Resource Center are collaborating to bring Tibaji to campus for a 10-week artistic residency this fall.

“This piece is not theatrical storytelling in the traditional sense,” observed Professor George Contini of the department of theatre and film studies. “The stories we’ve collected provided an amazing wealth of images, anecdotes, and emotions around the issues of gender and identity.  Always (K)new serves to weave them as a tapestry. But similar to the very formation of identity, sometimes the words and images sync and other times they repel one another.”

In describing his work, Tibaji stated that through engaging with autobiographical techniques he is became convinced of their significance to both theatre and human rights activism. “The importance of real narratives in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights is undeniable but it is also important to fight for the formation of a new sensibility that can inspire respect for diversity in a broader sense and can queer traditional ways of telling life stories in theatre.”

Performances will be held Dec. 1 and Dec. 2 at 7.30 p.m. They are free and open to the public.

A panel discussion with Tibaji and others on Nov. 15 will examine the unique process being used in creating Always (K)new.

Dec
2
Sat
“Always (K)new” – Theatrical Performance
Dec 2 @ 7:30 pm
"Always (K)new" - Theatrical Performance @ Seney-Stovall Chapel  | Athens | Georgia | United States

Always (K)new is an original cross-cultural theatrical oral history project that draws from stories of LGBTQ individuals collected in Georgia, Colombia, and Brazil. It is being developed in collaboration with Alberto Tibaji, an internationally recognized theatre artist from Brazil who specializes in using autobiographical techniques in devising original movement/text pieces drawn from personal narratives. The Willson Center, the Latin American Caribbean Studies Institute, the Portuguese Flagship Program, the department of theatre and film studies, and the LGBT Resource Center are collaborating to bring Tibaji to campus for a 10-week artistic residency this fall.

“This piece is not theatrical storytelling in the traditional sense,” observed Professor George Contini of the department of theatre and film studies. “The stories we’ve collected provided an amazing wealth of images, anecdotes, and emotions around the issues of gender and identity.  Always (K)new serves to weave them as a tapestry. But similar to the very formation of identity, sometimes the words and images sync and other times they repel one another.”

In describing his work, Tibaji stated that through engaging with autobiographical techniques he is became convinced of their significance to both theatre and human rights activism. “The importance of real narratives in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights is undeniable but it is also important to fight for the formation of a new sensibility that can inspire respect for diversity in a broader sense and can queer traditional ways of telling life stories in theatre.”

Performances will be held Dec. 1 and Dec. 2 at 7.30 p.m. They are free and open to the public.

A panel discussion with Tibaji and others on Nov. 15 will examine the unique process being used in creating Always (K)new.

Dec
9
Sat
“Sharing Our Stories” – Exhibition in Downtown Eatonton
Dec 9 all-day

“Sharing Our Stories” is an academic and community initiative funded by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities and guided by Christopher Lawton, director of experiential learning for Putnam County Schools and director of the Georgia Virtual History Project. It a partnership initiative of the Willson Center, the Putnam County Charter School District, the GVHP, and the Georgia Writers Museum.

The project is part of an ongoing effort to involve the Putnam County community in telling its own stories, both as context for, and document of, this crucial American literary landscape which gave birth to both Joel Chandler Harris and Alice Walker.

Putnam County High School students and faculty, working with local community members, will curate an enormous exhibition celebrating the photographs and documents scanned at the Briar Patch Arts Festival and Butler-Baker Octoberfest. These materials will be on display throughout downtown Eatonton during the annual Christmas Parade.

Additional partners for this event are the Butler-Baker Alumni Project, Eatonton Main Street, the Briar Patch Arts Council, the Uncle Remus Museum, the Eatonton-Putnam Historical Society, the Putnam County NAACP, and the Old School History Museum.

Common Heritage – the NEH grant program that will aid the “Sharing Our Stories” project – is intended to “support both the digitization of cultural heritage materials and the organization of public programming at community events that explore these materials as a window on a community’s history and culture.”

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Jan
19
Fri
Elizabeth Popp Berman – Lecture
Jan 19 @ 3:30 pm
Elizabeth Popp Berman - Lecture @ MLC Room 213
Elizabeth Popp Berman is an associate professor of sociology at the University at Albany, SUNY, working at the intersection of economic sociology, the sociology of knowledge, and science and technology studies. Most of her work focuses on recent U.S. history (1960s to 1980s) and emphasizes the role of public policy.
 
She will be presenting research from her main current project, a book entitled Thinking Like an Economist: How Economics Became the Language of U.S. Public Policy (under contract with Princeton University Press). Her talk is part of the Georgia Workshop on Culture, Power and History.
Jan
22
Mon
Brian Losch – “Recording Live Orchestra for Broadcast: Multiple Concerts, Edits, and Live Mix Using Pyramix Digital Audio Workstation Software”
Jan 22 @ 5:30 pm
Brian Losch - "Recording Live Orchestra for Broadcast: Multiple Concerts, Edits, and Live Mix Using Pyramix Digital Audio Workstation Software” @ Edge Recital Hall, Hugh Hodgson School of Music

Making recordings for Sony Masterworks, EMI, Deutsche Grammophon, Decca, and The Metropolitan Opera, Brian Losch has production credits which span multiple genres and include artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer, Chris Thile, Stuart Duncan, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and the New York Philharmonic. As an engineer, he has worked on film scores for The American Boychoir and ESPN Films, broadcasts for Metropolitan Opera HD, San Francisco Ballet, and the New York Philharmonic with guests including Tony Bennett, Celine Dion, and Andrea Bocelli.

Losch has received a Grammy Award (Best Engineered Album, Classical) for Winter Morning Walks, two Grammy Certificates of Participation (Best Folk Album and Best Engineered Album, Non- classical) for his work on The Goat Rodeo Sessions, a Certificate of Participation for work on Steven Mackey’s Grammy-award winning Lonely Motel, and Downbeat Awards for his studio and live recordings. As an engineer, he has worked on a variety of respected music productions and continues to do so in New York City.

Feb
2
Fri
Robert Hopkins – “TBA”
Feb 2 @ 3:31 pm
Robert Hopkins - "TBA" @ Peabody Hall, 115

Robert Hopkins is a professor and chair of the department of philosophy at NYU. His research is mostly in the philosophy of mind and aesthetics. He has worked on pictorial representation and picture perception (the subject of a book, Picture, Image and Experience, 1998), on other topics central to the philosophy of the visual arts, including the aesthetics of sculpture, photography, painting and film; and on other mental states that relate in interesting ways to our perception of pictures: perception itself, experiential imagining, and episodic memory. He’s also written on the epistemology and metaphysical status of aesthetic and moral judgement.

Work on these topics has appeared in various journals, including Mind, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Nous, Journal of Philosophy and Philosophical Review. In 2001 he was awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize in recognition of his research. For several years he was honorary secretary of the Mind Association. He is current president of the European Society for Aesthetics.

Feb
8
Thu
Global Georgia Initiative: Qiu Xiaolong – Reading and Conversation: “A Chinese Cop in the Global Age” – Betty Jean Craige Lecture in Comparative Literature
Feb 8 @ 4:00 pm
Global Georgia Initiative: Qiu Xiaolong - Reading and Conversation: "A Chinese Cop in the Global Age" - Betty Jean Craige Lecture in Comparative Literature @ Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium | Athens | Georgia | United States

Qiu Xiaolong was born in Shanghai, China. He published prize-winning poetry, translation and criticism in Chinese in the eighties, and became a member of the Chinese Writers’ Association. In 1988, he came to the United States as a Ford Foundation Fellow, started writing in English, and obtained a Ph.D. in comparative literature at Washington University.

He is the author of Death of a Red Heroine (2000), A Loyal Character Dancer (2002), When Red Is Black (2004), A Case of Two Cities (2006), Red Mandarin Dress (2007), The Mao Case (2009), Don’t Cry, Tai Lake (2012), Enigma of China (2013), Shanghai Redemption (2015), and Becoming Inspector Chen (in French and Italian, 2016 and 2017) in the critically acclaimed, award-winning Inspector Chen series; a collection of linked stories Years of Red Dust (first serialized in Le Monde, 2010); three poetry translations, Treasury of Chinese Love Poems (2003), Evoking T’ang (2007) and 100 Classic Chinese Poems (2010); and his own poetry collections, Lines Around China (2003) and Poems of Inspector Chen (2016).

Qiu’s books have sold over two million copies worldwide and have been published in 20 languages. He currently lives in St. Louis with his wife and daughter.

The event will include readings by Qiu and a conversation with Nicholas Allen, Franklin Professor of English and director of the Willson Center. It is presented as the Department of Comparative Literature’s annual Betty Jean Craige Lecture. Betty Jean Craige is University Professor Emerita of Comparative Literature and a former director of the Willson Center.

The Global Georgia Initiative presents global problems in local context with a focus on how the arts and humanities can intervene. The series is made possible by the support of private individuals and the Willson Center Board of Friends.

Feb
12
Mon
Shu-mei Shih – “Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature.”
Feb 12 @ 5:00 pm
Shu-mei Shih - “Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature.”

Shu-mei Shih is a professor of comparative literature, Asian languages and cultures, and Asian American studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among other works, her book, Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations Across the Pacific (2007), has been attributed as having inaugurated a new field of study called Sinophone Studies. Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (2013) is a textbook that she co-edited for the field.

Besides Sinophone studies, her areas of research include comparative modernism, as in the book The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937 (2001); theories of transnationalism, as in her co-edited Minor Transnationalism (2005); critical race studies, as in her guest-edited special issue of PMLA entitled “Comparative Racialization” (2008); critical theory, as in her co-edited Creolization of Theory (2011); Taiwan studies, as in her guest-edited special issue of Postcolonial Studies entitled “Globalization and Taiwan’s (In)significance” and the co-edited volume Comparatizing Taiwan (2015) and Knowledge Taiwan (2016).

She is currently working on two monographs entitled Empires of the Sinophone and Comparison as Relation, and two co-edited volumes: Keywords of Taiwan Theory and World Studies: Theories and Debates.