Research Seminars

Willson Center Research Seminars support faculty organizing year-long interdisciplinary discussion groups on particular research topics. Seminars bring to campus scholars from other institutions.

2014 – 2015

Faculty Seminar on the Book

Continued from 2013-2014
Organizers: Miriam Jacobson (English), Anne Meyers DeVine (Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to explore the nature of the book in all its forms, across time and space. The goals are twofold, to pose fundamental questions such as: what makes a book a book, how have cultural attitudes toward books and book making changed, are digital media recuperating or killing print media? And to investigate and analyze the various media that contribute to the production of books such as ink, e-ink, paper, screen, manuscript, print, pixels, binding, and book arts, as well as the production processes themselves.

manuscript

The Georgia Colloquium in 18th-and 19th-Century Literature

Continued from 2013-2014
Organizers: Roxanne Eberle (English), Casie LeGette (English), Chloe Wigston Smith (English)

The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature is a new speaker program that promotes intellectual inquiry across the disciplines and provides a forum for faculty and graduate students within the department, and from regional and national universities, to present recent work.

2014-2015 Lectures:

  • Paula Backscheider: “Crisis Texts: Staging the Wartime Woman,” Nov. 11
  • Andrew Stauffer: “Traces in the Stacks: Digitization and the Future of Nineteenth-Century Print,” Feb. 3
  • Danielle Coriale: “Social Zoology, A New Species of Literature,” Apr. 2
Elias Martin drawing crop

Georgia Workshop on Culture, Power and History

Continued from 2013-2014
Organizers: Pablo Lapegna (Sociology and LACSI), David Smilde (Sociology)

This workshop seeks to provide an interdisciplinary discursive space for social scientific research that sees meaning creation (culture) as central to the way humans create social structure; regards structured inequality (power) as a central aspect of the social world; and focuses on concrete actors and structures as they develop through time (history). The workshop provides a space for faculty and graduate students to keep abreast of new research, as well as a low stakes arena in which they can present new ideas.

Sociology graphic

Workshop in the History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power

Continued from 2013-2014
Organizers: Shane Hamilton (History), Daniel Rood (History), Hilda Kurtz (Geography)

The Georgia Workshop on the History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power serves as a forum in which graduate students, faculty, visiting researchers can present their ideas and arguments with other scholars already engaged with the integuments of food, place, and power. The proposed Workshop brings together UGA faculty and graduate students in a monthly interdisciplinary discussion group. Visitors are invited to share a paper or book chapter in progress.

History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power

2013 – 2014

Faculty Seminar on the Book

Continued from 2012-2013
Organizers: Miriam Jacobson (English), Anne Meyers DeVine (Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

This interdisciplinary seminar aims to explore the nature of the book in all its forms, across time and space. The goals are twofold, to pose fundamental questions such as: what makes a book a book, how have cultural attitudes toward books and book making changed, are digital media recuperating or killing print media? And to investigate and analyze the various media that contribute to the production of books such as ink, e-ink, paper, screen, manuscript, print, pixels, binding, and book arts, as well as the production processes themselves. The seminar takes the form of two symposia, November 16 and February 1.

manuscript

The Georgia Colloquium in 18th-and 19th-Century Literature

Continued from 2012-2013
Organizers: Roxanne Eberle (English), Casie LeGette (English), Chloe Wigston Smith (English)

The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature is a new speaker program that promotes intellectual inquiry across the disciplines and provides a forum for faculty and graduate students within the department, and from regional and national universities, to present recent work.

2013-2014 Lectures:

Elias Martin drawing crop

Georgia Workshop on Culture, Power and History

Continued from 2012-2013
Organizers: Pablo Lapegna (Sociology and LACSI), David Smilde (Sociology)

This workshop seeks to provide an interdisciplinary discursive space for social scientific research that sees meaning creation (culture) as central to the way humans create social structure; regards structured inequality (power) as a central aspect of the social world; and focuses on concrete actors and structures as they develop through time (history). The workshop provides a space for faculty and graduate students to keep abreast of new research, as well as a low stakes arena in which they can present new ideas.

Sociology graphic

Historical Poetics

Organizers: Tricia Lootens (English), Cody Marrs (English)

The seminar in Historical Poetics will hold a symposium from 1 to 5 p.m. on January 25 in the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building. The symposium will feature talks by Michael Moon, of Emory University, and Meredith McGill, of Rutgers University.

Historical Poetics - Whitman manuscript

History and Gender Workshop

Continued from 2012-2013
Organizers: Jennifer L. Palmer (History), Kathleen Clark (History)

This seminar examines the historical scholarship on gender as a central matter for research within the History Department — one which cuts across temporal and geographic boundaries, and draws together scholars who study topics from ancient Greece to modern-day Mexico. The History and Gender Workshop at UGA will help to foster common interests based on gender, and to draw scholars from diverse fields.

Group_of_Women_Airforce_Service_Pilots_and_B-17_Flying_Fortress

Workshop in the History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power

Organizers: Shane Hamilton (History), Daniel Rood (History)

The Georgia Workshop on the History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power serves as a forum in which graduate students, faculty, visiting researchers can present their ideas and arguments with other scholars already engaged with the integuments of food, place, and power. The proposed Workshop brings together UGA faculty and graduate students in a monthly interdisciplinary discussion group. Visitors are invited to share a paper or book chapter in progress.

History and Geography of Food, Place, and Power

2012 – 2013

The Georgia Colloquium in 18th-and 19th-Century Literature

Organizers: Roxanne Eberle (English), Casie LeGette (English), Chloe Wigston Smith (English)

The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature is a new speaker program that promotes intellectual inquiry across the disciplines and provides a forum for faculty and graduate students within the department, and from regional and national universities, to present recent work.

2012-2013 Lectures:

  • Keith Wilson: “Regionalism and Consciousness: Thomas Hardy’s Imagined Geographies,” Oct. 23
  • Rebecca Stern: “Reading Geologically: Particulate Matter and the Novel,” Nov. 9
  • Misty Anderson: “The Scottish Play: Centlivre and The Wonder of Britishness,” Jan. 30
  • Jon Mee: “Talking Books: Literature’s Conversable World 1760-1830,” March 7
Elias Martin drawing crop

Religion and Politics in Ancient North Africa

Organizer: Naomi J. Norman (Classics)

This seminar keeps abreast of the latest scholarship on the political, economic, religious, and cultural aspects of ancient North Africa during Punic and Roman occupation (spanning from the ninth century B.C.E. to the seventh century C.E.).

Ancient map of North Africa

Historical Phenomenon of Modernism

Organizer: Jed Rasula (English)

This seminar investigates the historical phenomenon of Modernism as it was manifested in literature, music, dance, film, and the visual arts. The seminars in Modernism will involve faculty and students from the Lamar Dodd School of Art, the Hugh Hodgson School of Music, and the Departments of English, Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, German and Slavic Studies, Theatre and Film Studies, and History.

Modernist painting