Willson Center / EECP Odum Lecture

The Environmental Ethics Certificate Program (EECP)Eugene Odum is a non-degree program offered as an enhancement to an undergraduate or graduate degree. The EECP provides an interdisciplinary forum for students, faculty, and the community to discuss social and scientific responsibilities toward our environment.

Eugene Odum (1913-2002) was an influential University of Georgia instructor from 1940 until his retirement in 1984. He is considered to be the “Father of Modern Ecology” and was the author of the pioneering book Fundamentals of Ecology. Odum was instrumental in the creation of the Institute of Ecology at the University of Georgia, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory near Aiken, S.C., and the Sapelo Island Marine Science Institute.

The Willson Center/EECP lecture is hosted by Dorinda G. Dallmeyer, director of the Environmental Ethics Certificate Program.

 

Wes JacksonWes Jackson

Wes Jackson, President of The Land Institute, earned a B.A. in biology from Kansas Wesleyan, an M.A. in botany from University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. in genetics from North Carolina State University. He established and served as chair of one of the country’s first environmental studies programs at California State University-Sacramento and then returned to his native Kansas to found The Land Institute in 1976. He is the author of several books including New Roots for AgricultureBecoming Native to This Place, Consulting the Genius of the Place, and most recently Nature as Measure. Wes is widely recognized as a leader in the international movement for a more sustainable agriculture. He was a 1990 Pew Conservation Scholar, in 1992 became a MacArthur Fellow, and in 2000 received the Right Livelihood Award (called the “alternative Nobel prize”). Life magazine named Wes Jackson as one of 18 individuals it predicts will be among the 100 “important Americans of the 20th century.” In November 2005, Smithsonian called him one of “35 Who Made a Difference.”

Wes Jackson’s lecture takes place at 2 p.m. March 28 in the UGA Chapel.